my students are awesome (2)

“…each word must fit in the sentence like a stone in a bridge; using the thesaurus can help me find the keystone word that holds the sentence together.” ~ Spike

I . . . began to recognize the usefulness of creating multiple drafts.
I began to forget about my perfectionism and
simply write what I thought.
My writing has slowly been becoming more raw.
I write first to express myself, and then go back to tweak and perfect it. I have learned that it is
in this way that writers capture and write with a voice.”
~ Kate

“I started to notice a lot of the structural problems more because it wasn’t very motivated writing in the first place. Powerful writing can have lots of errors, for example, I’m reading a book written in the Civil Rights Era, and the author uses common vernacular of the Deep South. It’s not necessarily grammatically correct, but it’s powerful. What I have here is not powerful writing.” ~ Elise
“I had never been instructed to develop the transitions in my writing. Since this writing course has begun, there has been quite an emphasis on making transitions between paragraphs and ideas. I know that these transitions are what glues ideas and themes together to make one concrete precise idea. This is one of the newly identified parts of the writing world that I have been able to understand better now.” ~ Jake
“I need to focus on writing for the audience at hand. If large words and a dismissive tone best serve my goal, then that is how I should write. If choppy sentences and a friendly tone best serve my goal, then that is how I should write. If a meandering, diary-style discourse best fulfills the assignment, then that is how I should write. If a rigid format and cohesive narrative best fulfills the assignment, then that is how I should write. I need to learn to be come a multifaceted writer, able to change tone and diction to meet varying tasks.” ~ Dave

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