cranking!

Ruth detected that I “sound better” even via pager this morning. 🙂 You know – I got that paper done and submitted, just got plane tickets to DC for both upcoming trips – NAMI/Breakout and Conference of Interpreter Trainers.
My roomies have arrived, are settling in, and all is “go” for us to hang tonight and start sorting out details. My room’s still a bit of a disaster, but it is taking shape. I need to get the small dresser and bedside table from VT, then I should be set.


I’m going to give a group dynamics workshop on how to use an interpreter at the NAMI/Breakout VIII. It’s the largest annual conference for Deaf social services providers, and getting it combined with the National Alliance for Mental Health was brilliant. 🙂 At CIT I’m gonna be soaking things up, but will present my “Why Bother?” poster (same one I did in Stockholm for Critical Link 4).
“The Breakout Conference is a national, interdisciplinary event that brings together professionals who provide culturally competent community mental health services, particularly psychosocial and psychiatric rehabilitation, to people who are deaf, hard of hearing, late deafened, and deafblind. Breakout provides information on treatment, research, best practice models, resources, and networking for consumers and providers of mental health and addiction services to the deaf community.
Breakout VIII will be held in partnership with NAMI’s 25th Anniversary Convention, September 8-12, 2004, at the Washington Hilton Hotel in Washington, DC. Two main themes guide presentations at NAMI/Breakout: Best Practices and Consumer and Family Involvement:
Best Practices: Unique approaches or best practices in community-based or statewide programs that have shown to be particularly effective in serving people who are deaf, hard of hearing, late deafened, or deafblind.
Consumer and Family Involvement: Consumers and family members can get involved in providing mental health and substance abuse services. Presenters will share experiences involving deaf/hard of hearing consumers and family members in treatment, peer support, and policy initiatives.

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