Going to Alaska!

We are going to rock the house! ๐Ÿ™‚ Spent today refining the design; I’m feeling quite good about it.
I’m building on success from Boston’s PM/WAD workshop at the CGO, where we really nailed a problematic moment with a sophisticated group of organizational diversity consultants. Exhausting (I’ll need good rest!), but gives me a great sense of optimism for the large group activity in the workshop. Had a fun flurry of emails today from the organizers – always love to pick up the jazz via cyberspace!
Also building on all the recent paper-writing on problematic moments (and aren’t I glad THAT’s done for awhile!) and the CGO workshop, I did something new while interpreting last week that I’ve never done before and don’t recall seeing anyone else do. There was a moment of din – when literally everyone in the group burst out with something at the same time. Instead of trying to continue with the thread of the primary speaker’s comment I represented the verbal action of the din. It felt…right, somehow. ๐Ÿ™‚ The Deaf interlocutor was with the group’s outburst, not informed of it after the fact.

anecdotes

Hmmm, its been awhile now, but I was thinking about a conversation I had after a job with a new Deaf person…she was telling me she had “a bad habit of teasing the interpreters” and I said I had “a bad habit of interpreting so that the hearing people know what’s going on.” My team interpreter raised her eyebrows at me, but since then we’ve both been voicing those comments and the Deaf person is being more integrated into the class as others get to experience her sense of humor.
Then, there was the time a student was waiting to talk to a professor and right when it was her turn another hearing student walked up and even though I was already voicing her comments this guy just started talking right over me! And the teacher turned to him! It could have been a gender thing in addition to the Deaf/hearing thing…at any rate, I wasn’t very graceful: I immediately said, “Excuse me, its her turn” and resumed the interpretation. The student apologized but the instructor didn’t. Unfortunately, I was just subbing that day, so the intervention probably didn’t “stick.” ๐Ÿ™
More positively, the interpreter confidentiality bill is making progress in the Vermont House and looks like it will get passed on to the State Senate in time for a vote to happen this year. Yeah!

Alaska!

It’s really true! Check this out (from their promotional materials) ๐Ÿ™‚
The Art of Juggling Conference
April 23rd, 24th, 25th, 2004
At the Anchorage Hilton Downtown
Deaf Interpreter Presenters: Julie Simon & Steve Walker
ASL Language Presenter: Trix Bruce
Interpreting Presenter: Stephanie Jo Kent
Stephanie Jo Kent, CI, MS, has been interpreting for a decade. She earned a master’s degree in social justice education in 1996 and is in her second year of doctoral studies in communication.
Steph has worked at two residential deaf schools, was a member of the planning team for the Allies conferences from 1997-1999, and co-presented

edited letter to the editor

The Reformer printed my letter in the Weekend issue yesterday with an interesting insertion. They deleted “your coverage” and added the words “Associated Press article”, apparently to distance themselves from it? The author is unidentified on the website and it seems we’ve already recycled the paper…
Here’s my original text – apparently they posted all the letters EXCEPT for mine from that day!
Dear Editor,
I was disappointed to read the bias in your coverage of the trial requiring the use of sign language interpreters. By presenting non-deaf people’s experience of adjusting to the cultural differences and linguistic issues involved in interpreting as